Author Archives: Christopher Intagliata

Moon’s Tug Doesn’t Cause Big Quakes

An analysis of more than 200 earthquakes over the past four centuries concludes there’s no connection between moon phases and big earthquakes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Salmonella Could Have Caused 16th-Century Epidemic

Using a new algorithm, geneticists uncovered the pathogen that could have caused a massive epidemic in the Aztec empire: Salmonella bacteria. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Which Came First, the Proboscis or the Flower?

A new fossil find reveals that the sucking tongue of butterflies—or proboscis—appears to have evolved before the emergence of flowers. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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You Live in a Strange Solar System

Astronomers found that other star systems tend to host similarly sized exoplanets—far different from ours. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Finches Can Learn To Sing Differently Than Their Genetics Dictate

The song training that Bengalese finches received appeared to overcome tempo tendencies baked into their genes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Finding Further Places For Solar Panels

Siting solar panels over rooftops, parking lots, reservoirs and contaminated land could generate heaps of energy—with minimal effects on agriculture or the environment. Christopher Intagliata…

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This Fish Emits Damaging Decibels

The Gulf corvina produces a chattering chorus that’s one of the loudest underwater animal sounds on the planet. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Radiation Might Help Heart Regain Its Rhythm

A flash of radiation drastically reduced arrhythmia in a small group of patients, for at least a year after treatment. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Something Clicks for Dolphin Identification

Machine-learning algorithms teased seven distinct dolphin clicking patterns from a library of more than 50 million clicks, identifying one species by sound alone. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Invasive Frogs Don’t Bug Hawaiian Birds

Coquí frogs are invasive species in Hawaii. But they don’t seem to bug the islands’ native and non-native birds. Jason G. Goldman reports.

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How Hospitals Can Dampen the Decibels

Hospitals consistently score low on quietness surveys. An acoustician suggests a few ways hospitals could keep the peace and quiet. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Computers Learn to Use Sound to Find Ships

Researchers trained machine-learning algorithms to pinpoint the location of a cargo ship simply by eavesdropping on the sound of its passing. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Republican Voters Not in Denial About Climate

An analysis of voter opinions finds that half of Republican voters think climate change is happening, and would support regulating CO2 as a pollutant. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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A New Recipe for Counting Cranberries

Estimating cranberry harvests involves tedious hand counting. But microwave analysis could change all that. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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How Fit Is Bitcoin?

A new analysis treats bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies as species in an evolutionary model—and finds bitcoin has no selective advantage. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Ancient 1 Percenters Were Beast-Based

New World societies long ago likely had less income inequality than those in the Old World, and the difference might have been an oxen gap. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Insect Brain System Knows What You Want

Computer scientists borrowed insights from the fruit fly brain to create a more accurate search algorithm. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Sheep’s Face-Reading Skills Stand Out from the Flock

With some training, sheep were able to select a celebrity’s face over that of a stranger they’d never seen. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Mammoth Remains Seem Mostly Male

In a sample of 98 woolly mammoth remains, researchers found that 70 percent were male—which suggests males were more likely to die accidentally. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Physics Phenomenon Reveals a Pyramid’s Mystery

Scientists used muons, a by-product of cosmic rays, to image the interior of the Great Pyramid—and found a previously unknown space inside. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Drought News Might Help Cut Water Waste

As news coverage of California’s most recent drought intensified, water use trends went down—suggesting news might inspire consumers to conserve. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Smog Casts a Shadow on China’s Solar Farms

The wintertime smog in China’s northeastern provinces is so severe it blocks more than 20 percent of sunlight from reaching the region’s solar panels. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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California Gun Injuries Spike after Nevada Gun Shows

Firearm deaths and injuries went up in California communities after gun shows in neighboring Nevada—but not after more strictly regulated California gun shows. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Biometric Identifies You in a Heartbeat

Like fingerprints and facial recognition, the shape and beat of your heart can be used to verify your identity. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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When We Fly to Mars, Microbes Will, Too

The microbes that live in and on our bodies will colonize a human-manned spacecraft to Mars—but will the spacecraft’s microbiome be safe? Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Tsunami Sent Species on a Transoceanic Trip

The 2011 east Japan tsunami swept huge amounts of wreckage out to sea—and Japanese species hitchhiked across the Pacific on the debris. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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This Frog Can’t Hear Its Own Calls

The frogs’ calls are too high-pitched for the frog to detect, which may be an artifact of evolution. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Building a Better Mirror for Telescopes

More reflective telescope mirrors allow astronomers to capture more photons—and do more science. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Warming Puts Squeeze on Ancient Trees

As temperatures rise, the tree line moves upslope. But ancient bristlecone pines are losing that upslope race to faster-colonizing neighbors. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Rising CO2 Pushes Plants to Drink Sparingly

As carbon dioxide levels rise, plants are sipping water more efficiently—which could come in handy in a drier future. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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