Author Archives: Christopher Intagliata

No Bull: Lizards Flee When They See Red

Western fence lizards are more spooked by red and gray shirts than they are by blue ones—perhaps because the males have blue bellies themselves. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Celebrities Tweet Like Bots

Celebrity Twitter accounts look a lot like Twitter bots: They tweet regularly, follow relatively few people, and upload a lot of content. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Cold Snap Shapes Lizard Survivors

An epic bout of cold weather quickly altered a population of lizards—an example of natural selection in action. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Mediterranean Diet Works–for Upper Crust

Italians who stuck closely to the heart-healthy diet had fewer heart attacks and strokes—but only if they were well-off and/or college educated. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

This Caterpillar Whistles While It Irks

The North American walnut sphinx caterpillar produces a whistle that sounds just like a songbird’s alarm call–and the whistle seems to startle birds. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Bacteria Can Be Resistant to Brand-New Antibiotics

Exposure to existing antibiotics can imbue infectious bacteria with resistance that also kicks in against new drugs related to the originals. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Teaching Computers to Enjoy the View

Researchers in the U.K. trained computers to rate photos of parks and cities for what humans consider to be their scenic beauty. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Flying through a Corpse’s Clues

Forensic entomologists can chemically analyze fly eggs from a corpse, which might speed up detective work. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

This Cell Phone Needs No Battery

An experimental cell phone works by absorbing and reflecting radio waves—meaning it’s incredibly energy efficient and needs no battery. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Bacteria Might Share the Blame for Eczema

In patients with severe eczema, Staphylococcus aureus strains dominated the skin microbe population—suggesting that certain types of bacteria could worsen eczema flares. Christopher Intagliata…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Heat Will Hit America’s Poorest Worst

Economists calculate that each degree Celsius of warming will dock the U.S. economy by 1.2 percent–and increase the divide between rich and poor. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Rainbow Photons Pack More Computing Power

Quantum bits, aka qubits, can simultaneously encode 0 and 1. But multicolored photons could enable even more states to exist at the same time, ramping up computing power. Christopher Intagliata…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Moths Inspire Better Smartphone Screens

Researchers designed an antireflective coating for smartphone screens, with inspiration from the bumpy eyes of moths. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Keep Rolling Luggage Upright with Physics

A team of physicists has revealed why rolling suitcases start rocking from wheel to wheel—and how to avoid that frustrating phenomenon. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Engineers Build Bendy Batteries for Wearables

Researchers built silver–zinc batteries that can bend and stretch—meaning they could be more elegantly integrated into future wearable devices. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Rising Temps Lower Polar Bear Mercury Intake

As polar bears are forced onto land, they’re feeding on animals with less mercury—reducing their levels of the toxic pollutant. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Some Hotel Bed Bug Sightings May Be Bogus

Only a third of travelers could correctly identify a bed bug—suggesting that some bug sightings in online reviews could be cases of mistaken identity. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Chromosomes Combat Counterfeit Caviar

Researchers found unique genetic variants that differentiate costly beluga caviar from cheaper fakes that rip off consumers. Christopher Intagliata reports

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Trees Beat Lawns for Water Hungry L.A.

Evaporation from overwatered lawns cost the city of Los Angeles 70 billion gallons of wasted water a year. But the city’s trees were much thriftier. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Fitness Bands Fail on Calorie Counts

Activity trackers accurately reckon heart rate—but they’re way off in estimates of energy expenditure. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

New Concrete Recipes Could Cut Cracks

Recipes for concrete that incorporate byproducts from the coal and steel industries, like fly ash and slag, could reduce road-salt related cracking. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Bees Prefer Flowers That Proffer Nicotine

Bumblebees sought out flowers with nicotine in their nectar, and the drug appeared to enhance the bees’ memories. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Field Study: Worms Leave ‘Til No-Till

Earthworm numbers doubled in fields after farmers switched from conventional ploughing to no-till agriculture. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

The Sneaky Danger of Space Dust

When tiny particles of space debris slam into satellites, the collision could cause the emission of hardware-frying radiation. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Insects Donate DNA to Unrelated Bugs

Bacteria swap DNA among themselves. And that process may be more common in multicellular organisms than previously believed. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Pollution Peaks When Temperatures Top Out

As temperatures rise, energy demands peak, with a corresponding increase in air pollutants. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Hot Chilies Cool Down Gut Inflammation in Mice

The spicy compound in chilies kicks off a chemical cascade that reduces gut inflammation and immune activity in mice. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Ancient Human DNA Found in Cave Dirt

Scientists uncovered genetic traces of Neandertals and Denisovans by screening cave dirt for DNA. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Gut Microbes Help Keep Starved Flies Fecund

Microbes living in the guts of fruit flies appear to influence the flies’ food choice—and promote egg production, even under a nutrient-poor diet. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Healthy Behavior Can Spread Like Illness

If people run more in New York City, that can push their socially connected counterparts in San Diego to run more as well. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |