Author Archives: Environment

Nearly 100 Volcanoes Discovered Beneath Antarctica’s Ice

You could say Antarctica sings a song of fire and ice.

The continent’s frigid reputation is well known, but researchers from the University of Edinburgh analyzed radar scans of the West Antarctic Rift System and found 138 volcanoes hiding under the … Continue reading

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Canadians Are First to Sample Genetically Modified Salmon

After a protracted fight, salmon have become the first genetically modified animal to be sold in stores.

The salmon, implanted with genes that boost their growth, come from the U.S.-based biotech firm AquaBounty Technologies, which has been attempt… Continue reading

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A New Take on the Biodegradable Car

A concept car in the Netherlands is constructed almost entirely of materials the grow in the soil.

Called “Lina,” the biodegradable car is the work of students at Eindhoven University of Technology and is composed mainly of sugar beet resin and fla… Continue reading

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Marijuana: An Environmental Buzzkill

Pot growers have turned public lands into industrial agricultural sites. And the ecosystem effects are alarming. Continue reading

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How Scientists Are Saving The Dodo’s Pink Cousin

“Voldemort outlived Harry Potter,” Christelle Ferriere tells me as we walk around the small, uninhabited island of Ile aux Aigrettes, off the east coast of Mauritius. “Whoever bands them gets to name them,” she explains. Ferriere is a bird ex… Continue reading

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Love Monarchs? Participate in the Monarch Monitoring Blitz This Week!

By Cora Lund Preston, Communication Specialist for Monarch Joint Venture

The Monarch Monitoring Blitz has begun! Grab your hats, sunscreen and clipboards and join fellow citizen scientists for some fresh air and an international monarch monitoring bli… Continue reading

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Welcome to ‘The Frozone’

The changing Arctic revealed through key scientific outposts and technologies. Continue reading

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What’s Going On With the World’s Most Destructive Mud Volcano?

The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting. The mud volcano known as Lusi started on May 29, 2006, and at … Continue reading

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If You Could Dig a Hole Through The Earth, Here’s Where You’d Pop Out

Almost every child, shovel in hand, is struck by a tempting thought. What if I just kept digging and popped out on the other side of the world? The imagination conjures a muddy face emerging in the middle of a Shaolin temple or some such, China being… Continue reading

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What Would It Take to Wipe Out All Life on Earth?

The first exoplanet was spotted in 1988. Since then more than 3,000 planets have been found outside our solar system, and it’s thought that around 20 percent of Sun-like stars have an Earth-like planet in their habitable zones. We don’t yet kno… Continue reading

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Network of Bees

By: Russ Campbell

There is a lot to learn from bees. The survival of the hive depends on the combined efforts of the entire colony. In Conetoe (pronounced KUH-nee-tah), North Carolina Reverend Richard Joyner and his family of youth beekeepers are tend… Continue reading

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A Delaware-sized Antarctic Iceberg Has Broken Into the Ocean

After months of dangling on by a miles-thin thread of ice, an iceberg roughly the size of Delaware just calved off Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf and began drifting out into the ocean.

Scientists say the complete breakthrough happened sometime betw… Continue reading

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Mississippi ‘Clean Coal’ Project Flops

A once-promising clean coal plant in Mississippi is set to switch to natural gas instead.

The facility, run by utility provider Southern Company, is over budget and behind schedule, and has failed to achieve its goal of producing electricity from co… Continue reading

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This Company Claims It Will Deliver Lab-grown Meats by 2018

Patties of beef grown in a lab could be hitting supermarket shelves as early as 2018.

That’s the bold statement from Hampton Creek, a San Francisco-based food company that produces mainly vegan condiments and cookie doughs. As the Wall Street Journa… Continue reading

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Solving the Centuries-old Mystery of Rare ‘Bright Nights’

On rare occasions throughout history, the darkness of night fails to materialize. Even with the moon darkened, the sky fills with a diffuse glow that seems to filter out of the very air itself. Such “bright nights” have been recorded back to the days… Continue reading

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Persistent, Deadly Heat at the Equator Could Be the Norm by 2100

Tuesday in Phoenix, Arizona, the temperature kept some planes grounded.

Phoenix was projected to reach of 120 degrees Fahrenheit, a near-record for the desert city, and hot enough that small planes cannot generate enough lift to fly. Phoenix and oth… Continue reading

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Australian Scientists Dredged the Deep Seafloor — Here’s What they Found

In a dark world of crushing pressures and barren landscapes, creatures we’ve never seen before, and, likely, couldn’t even imagine, are swimming.

The ocean’s abyssal zone begins over two miles beneath surface; it’s so deep that light never touches i… Continue reading

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Everything Worth Knowing About … Auroras

Colorful shape-shifters of the heavens. Continue reading

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What Carbon Really Costs

Even if we curb emissions, wrangling greenhouse gases will mean a price tag of trillions. Continue reading

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Everything Worth Knowing About … Ice

It’s everywhere! Continue reading

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Everything Worth Knowing About … the Future of Food

How we’ll serve 10 billion. Continue reading

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The Desert’s Living Skin

Communities of tiny plants and organisms protect arid landscapes. Now their survival is threatened. Continue reading

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Participate in Citizen Science to Celebrate World Oceans Day

This article was originally posted on August 21, 2013 but we thought this project provided a great way to celebrate World Oceans Day even if you can’t make it to the beach!

Calling all citizen scientists! It doesn’t matter where you are. You can sti… Continue reading

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Don’t Drain That Swamp! Accidental Wetlands Are Good for Cities

What’s so bad about wetlands? These mucky, sometimes mosquito-ridden landscapes have a bad reputation, but they offer benefits to their neighborhoods too. Researchers say “accidental” wetlands—pockets of cities that have turned into swamps through fl… Continue reading

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Blustery Winds Push European Energy Prices…Negative

Recent weather conditions in Europe have been a boon to the renewable energy grid there, pushing prices briefly negative overnight as high winds forced turbines into overdrive.

Energy prices in the U.K. dipped into the negatives for five hours on J… Continue reading

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The Mother of All Apples Is Disappearing

In the wilds of Kazakhstan, there’s an unassuming tree that bears an unassuming fruit. Like many plant species, development encroaches on its usual territory while climate change makes it harder for the tree to thrive and bear healthy yields of fru… Continue reading

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Diary of a Changing Planet

Federally funded long-term ecological research sites chronicle a planet in flux. Continue reading

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Retreating Ice Sheet Spurred Massive Methane Blowouts on the Seafloor

A massive reserve of methane — a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide — is trapped deep within the seafloor.

In northern latitudes, thick ice sheets act as a lid sequestering gases at the right temperature and pressure. But when that i… Continue reading

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Cities Are Bad for Bumblebees—Except Detroit

For bumblebees, big cities are a bummer. Layers of asphalt, concrete, brick and metal add up to fewer places for the insects to nest. But one big city—Detroit—reverses that trend. That means shrinking cities might be a growing opportunity for a… Continue reading

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With Improvements, Humanity’s ‘Doomsday’ Seed Vault Is Safe, Probably

Just nine years after its official opening, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway is undergoing renovations to protect it from climate change.

The work was prompted by accidental flooding that took place last week, as melting permafrost seeped in… Continue reading

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