Author Archives: Environment

Competition Meets Collaboration: The City Nature Challenge

When you hear the word “nature,” you’re likely to think of your last camping trip to a state park, or of grandiose landscapes with forests, lakes, and snow-capped mountains. You may remember the last trip to the beach and the variety of birds you… Continue reading

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No One Knows How Long the U.S. Coastline Is

How long is the U.S. coastline? It’s a straightforward question, and one that’s important for scientists and government agencies alike. The U.S. Geological Survey could give you an answer, too, but I’m going to tell you right now that it’s wrong.

In… Continue reading

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Citizen Science in the City

We’ve got a big weekend coming up for science! Not only is Citizen Science Day on April 14th, it’s also the March for Science and we’re also preparing for the City Nature Challenge! We’ve pulled together a long list of projects you could do in a c… Continue reading

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Climate Change Is Weakening a Crucial Ocean Current

When you picture the rugged coastlines of Norway, tropical heat probably doesn’t come to mind, but it should. Even in the country’s Arctic reaches, the coast is typically free from ice and snow, and the weather is often more Seattle than Anchorage…. Continue reading

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Dramatic satellite images reveal thick palls of dust choking Beijing and blowing across 2,000 miles of Asia

About a week ago, dust sweeping north from the Sahara blanketed parts of Eastern Europe, turning snow-covered ski slopes a strange shade of orange.

Now, another far-ranging pall of dust — exacerbated by nasty air pollution — is in the news, th… Continue reading

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How to Discover New Cloud Species

Clouds form in a multitude of different shapes and sizes, their infinite combinations and position across the sky offering a visual drama in response to the light conditions. But despite their apparent randomness, a detailed naming convention is i… Continue reading

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Sustainable Paper, Brought to You by Elephant Dung

Scientists may have found a way to generate environmentally friendly paper from poop—cow and elephant poop that is. Although this may seem strange and unconventional, this poo-per actually offers a more simple and sustainable alternative to the tra… Continue reading

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20 Things You Didn’t Know About … Diamonds

Though it may not be forever, this mineral is the hardest we know of, manifests as rain inside some gas planets and, in Renaissance folklore, was considered an amulet to ward off madness. Continue reading

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Repairing the Aral Sea

Checking in on plans to restore the body of water before it disappears entirely. Continue reading

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Scientists Record Volcanic Thunder For the First Time

When a volcano erupts, it can spew a cloud of ash miles into the stratosphere. It makes for an impressive sight, and an even more impressive amount of sheer material — large eruptions can loft cubic miles of rock and ash skyward.

And, to add to… Continue reading

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Come Hell or Supervolcano, Humanity Will Be Alright

Every year or so, a fresh rash of concern about the Yellowstone supervolcano spreads across the internet. While the likelihood of an eruption there remains remote, if the caldera were to blow, it could be devastating. Previous eruptions there covered… Continue reading

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Where the Wild Things Aren’t

Writer Ceri Levy and legendary artist Ralph Steadman go gonzo with animals on the brink. Continue reading

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Fishing activities take up four times as much area as agriculture—and can now be monitored in real time

The global footprint of fishing is even bigger than expected. But a novel monitoring tool could help put it on a more sustainable path.

To satisfy our hunger, we humans catch something on the order of one trillion fish ever year — a yield that… Continue reading

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Making the Case Against Plastic Straws

Walk the remote shores of the Great Lakes, far outside the city, and you’ll find miles of sandy beaches and quiet tranquility. You’ll also find plastic straws. Pink ones, white ones, clear ones. They’re everywhere.

In fact, visit any coastline… Continue reading

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Study Adds Weight to Benefits of Genetically Engineered Crops

A review of the research on genetically engineered corn concludes that the benefits appear to outweigh the drawbacks.

In a meta-analysis, where researchers synthesize the findings of many studies, researchers from the University of Pisa and the San… Continue reading

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An Adorable Dumbo Octopus Stretches Its ‘Wings’

See this little guy? He’s just emerged into the world, but the appropriately-named Dumbo octopus is already taking his first flaps.

Resemblance to a certain flying elephant notwithstanding, Dumbo octopuses actually live far below the ocean’s surface… Continue reading

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As Trump Seeks Climate Funding Cuts, Intelligence Community Highlights Risks

New research suggests that large parts of the world are headed for record-breaking extreme weather events. At the same time, the U.S. intelligence community has broken with President Trump on the threats posed by climate change and other environmenta… Continue reading

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Do Science With Your Loved Ones This Valentine’s Day!

Together, you can participate in any of these projects centered around the heart, love and care.

Cheers!

The SciStarter Team

Health eHeart Study 

Prefer to stay inside? Join 1 million participants in the Health eHeart… Continue reading

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In Iceland, Bitcoin Mining Could Suck Up More Energy Than Homes

Mining bitcoin is not a task for your average Joe. As far back as 2014, researchers estimated that profitable bitcoin mining was out of the reach of commercial hardware. The increasing difficulty of solving the equations that yield the digital curre… Continue reading

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Mass Extinctions Might Come From Below

New research ties mass extinctions to the rocks beneath our feet. Continue reading

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The Beetle, the Bird and the Tamarisk Tree

Ecologists seek balance as one non-native species eradicates another. Continue reading

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Super Bowl Citizen Science Projects from the Science Cheerleaders!

When the Philadelphia Eagles face the New England Patriots on Sunday, look for the brains on the sidelines.
A combined THIRTY Super Bowl cheerleaders are currently pursuing careers in STEM. Fifteen on the Patriots side and fifteen on th… Continue reading

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Super Bowl Citizen Science Projects from the Science Cheerleaders!

When the Philadelphia Eagles face the New England Patriots on Sunday, look for the brains on the sidelines. A combined THIRTY Super Bowl cheerleaders are currently pursuing careers in STEM. Fifteen on the Patriots side and fifteen on th… Continue reading

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Could Personal ‘Carbon Accounts’ Decelerate Climate Change?

A recent call from British Member’s of Parlaiment to put a 25 pence levy on disposable coffee cups, and bans on plastic products cropping up across the country, show that the UK is getting serious about tackling collective individual behavior which t… Continue reading

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Norwegian Flight Rides a Blustery Jet Stream to New Record

Passengers aboard jetliners making transatlantic flights are getting from point A to B much far faster.

On Thursday, a Norwegian 787 Dreamliner reached a speed of 779 mph after getting some help from a vigorous, 224 mph tailwind. The flight, DY7014,… Continue reading

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If We Start Geoengineering, There’s No Going Back

When it comes to climate change, speed kills.

The temperature changes that are causing heat waves, intense storms and other climate aberrations are dangerous today because they’re happening so fast. The climate has indeed been as warm, and warmer e… Continue reading

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What Happened the Last Time Antarctica Melted?

Earlier this week, an international team of geologists and climate scientists parked their ship off the coast of West Antarctica and started drilling. Their mission: To find out why glaciers here melted millions of years ago and what that can tell us… Continue reading

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Crawling Robot Baby Bravely Explores Carpet Gunk

To find out just how your relaxed vacuuming schedule is affecting your baby’s airway, researchers built a slightly frightening robotic infant.

This legless, metallic baby crawled across five wool rugs from real people’s homes in Finland. (The groun… Continue reading

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Crawling Robot Baby Bravely Explores Carpet Gunk

To find out just how your relaxed vacuuming schedule is affecting your baby’s airway, researchers built a slightly frightening robotic infant.

This legless, metallic baby crawled across five wool rugs from real people’s homes in Finland. (The groun… Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

SciStarter’s Top 10 Projects of 2017 are here!

What a year it has been! We now have more than 50,000 active members participating in over 1,700 projects on SciStarter. We can’t wait to see what 2018 brings.

From neurons to whales and everything in between, the 2017 Top 10 P… Continue reading

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