Author Archives: Environment

What Happened the Last Time Antarctica Melted?

Earlier this week, an international team of geologists and climate scientists parked their ship off the coast of West Antarctica and started drilling. Their mission: To find out why glaciers here melted millions of years ago and what that can tell us… Continue reading

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Crawling Robot Baby Bravely Explores Carpet Gunk

To find out just how your relaxed vacuuming schedule is affecting your baby’s airway, researchers built a slightly frightening robotic infant.

This legless, metallic baby crawled across five wool rugs from real people’s homes in Finland. (The groun… Continue reading

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Crawling Robot Baby Bravely Explores Carpet Gunk

To find out just how your relaxed vacuuming schedule is affecting your baby’s airway, researchers built a slightly frightening robotic infant.

This legless, metallic baby crawled across five wool rugs from real people’s homes in Finland. (The groun… Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

SciStarter’s Top 10 Projects of 2017 are here!

What a year it has been! We now have more than 50,000 active members participating in over 1,700 projects on SciStarter. We can’t wait to see what 2018 brings.

From neurons to whales and everything in between, the 2017 Top 10 P… Continue reading

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Blockchain Technologies Could Help You Profit from Green Energy

Imagine buying a solar panel from a hardware store, mounting it on your roof, then selling the green electricity you produce at a price you set.

Is this even possible? Some companies certainly think so. These startups are harnessing the power of … Continue reading

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Science Under Siege But Surviving

We break down the Trump administration’s salty relationship with science. Continue reading

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Harvey Redesigns Rainfall Maps

The deluge that swamped Houston changes how we measure downpours. Continue reading

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Solar Eclipses Make Waves in the Atmosphere

When the solar eclipse swept across the continental U.S. in August, it carved a subtle, but noticeable path through our atmosphere.

For the first time, researchers confirmed that that moon’s shadow generates a pair of bow waves in Earth’s ionosphere… Continue reading

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It’s time for winter solstice and lights!

USAF SrA Joshua Stran

We are finally at the tipping point, the daylight is getting a little longer with each waning night. We have a chance to look upwards and savor the night sky and tell scientists what we can see of it. For… Continue reading

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A Semi-Autonomous Cricket Farm to Feed the World

When Gabe Mott, Shobhita Soor and Mohammed Ashour proposed building a commercial-scale cricket farm optimized with robots and data, the idea earned the McGill University students the $1 million Hult Prize, the largest student competition for social g… Continue reading

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Science Under Siege But Surviving — a Trump Timeline

For many who value science, 2017 will be remembered as the dawn of a new era. January saw the inauguration of Donald Trump, a president who has denied climate change and filled his inner circle with anti-science activists. But the year was as much an… Continue reading

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A Geoengineered Future Is Downright Scary

Catastrophic climate change seems inevitable. Between the still-accelerating pace of greenhouse gas emissions and the voices of global warming deniers, hitting the targets laid out in the Paris Accord to slow the pace of a warming climate feels inc… Continue reading

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Indigenous People are Deploying Drones to Preserve Land and Traditions

Indigenous tribes from the Pacific Northwest to the Amazon Basin face a similar set of challenges: How to manage their lands, defend against corporate encroachment and document historic and religious sites for future generations. Often working with l… Continue reading

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We Can Do Better Than Road Salt

Marshes, streams and lakes lie alongside many of the roads and highways that zigzag across North America. Plants and animals inhabit these water bodies and can be exposed to many of the substances we put on those roads, including road salt.

Rock s… Continue reading

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The Dreadful Enormity of Southern California’s Wildfires

Space imagery reveals the scale of wildfires raging in SoCal. Continue reading

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Saving Sea Turtles Through Community Litter Cleanups

By: Christi Hughes

In January 2016, a young sea turtle named Grace was found floating cold and listless next to a dock in Awendaw, South Carolina. She was rescued by compassionate locals to the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center™ for lif… Continue reading

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Exploring the wonder of birds through the Migratory Shorebird Project

I used to think of birds as delicate creatures, airy and carefree, with pretty feathers and pretty songs. Then I saw the film “Winged Migration” and came to understand just how gritty and daring these lovely creatures really are.

The film uses bir… Continue reading

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Ben Kreckx

All of us at SciStarter want to thank you for learning about, sharing, or engaging in science. You inspire us. Thank you.

Below, you’ll find a cornucopia full of Thanksgiving-themed citizen science projects. Gobble … Continue reading

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Antarctic Fossils Reveal the Continent’s Lush Past

Antarctica, a land of near-lunar desolation and conditions so bleak few plants or animals dare stay, was once covered with a blanket of lush greenery.

The conception of the ice-coated continent as a forested Eden emerged in the early 1900s when … Continue reading

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Organic Farming Could Feed the World, But…

The United Nations estimates the global population will reach more than 9 billion by 2050, and, by some estimates, agricultural output will have to increase by 50 percent to feed all of those mouths. So is it possible to do it organically?

Modern fa… Continue reading

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20 Things You Didn’t Know About … Bears

The cute-but-dangerous creatures don’t actually hibernate, don’t gobble honey as much as people think and have a sketchy family tree. Continue reading

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The Life and Death of Pando

Researchers have partially hidden Earth’s largest life-form behind a small protective fence. Continue reading

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Europe’s Rivers Overfloweth

How climate change impacts flooding. Continue reading

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Spooktacular Citizen Science

Shaker Village

Treat yourself with citizen science this Halloween. Take a stroll through a pumpkin patch to look for insects or spend a night under the stars watching bats. Staying indoors? Map craters on the moon for NASA!… Continue reading

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How Volcanoes Starved Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt was the most powerful civilization in the world for a time. The monuments built by laborers to honor pharaohs stand to this day, testament to the vast resources at their command.

But the architectural excess hid a crippling weakness. … Continue reading

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An Autumn Bounty of Citizen Science

Season Spotter

Birds and monarchs are migrating and leaves are changing color. Fall is in full swing! Unfortunately, hurricanes are forming and flu season is here too.

Help scientists document nature and health changes near yo… Continue reading

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The Truth About Our Trash

Humans sure have made a mess of things. Here’s a breakdown of all the plastic waste we’ve dumped on our planet. Continue reading

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A Massive Volcano Beneath Europe Is Stirring

And millions of lives may be at risk. Continue reading

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Coal Almost Turned Earth into a Giant Ball of Ice

Coal, it’s the sooty fossil fuel that’s heated our homes and generated electricity for centuries, but millions of years ago its formation could’ve frozen the planet.

Coal deposits formed from dead trees and plants roughly 300 million years ago durin… Continue reading

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Dirty Birds Are Refining Climate Models

Enterprising researchers working at the Field Museum in Chicago dusted off a collection of Horned Larks to get a better look at the dirt trapped in their wings.

That’s because these birds, some more than a century in age, together form a unique, phy… Continue reading

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