Author Archives: Scientific American Content: Global

Mysteries of Life in the Universe

How did life begin on Earth? Does it exist elsewhere? What would those life forms be like? These fundamental questions about the nature of life and our own cosmic significance are endlessly…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Readers Respond to the December 2017 Issue

Letters to the editor from the December 2017 issue of Scientific American

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

What Is Pi, and How Did It Originate?

Steven Bogart, a mathematics instructor at Georgia Perimeter College, answers

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Spotlight on Women in Science

In honor of International Women’s Day, 2018, our latest coverage of women at the forefront of science

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Human Echolocators Use Tricks Similar to Bats

People who use echolocating mouth clicks to compensate for low vision increase the number and intensity of clicks when objects are harder to detect. Christopher Intagliata reports.

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Trailblazers: Women in Science

Sally Ride, the first American woman to go to space, once said that she didn’t set out to be a role model, but after her first flight, she realized that she was one. Like her, the 12 women…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Readers Respond to the November 2017 Issue

Letters to the editor from the November 2017 issue of Scientific American

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

1 Important Secret for Effective Communication

A strong beginning and an even stronger ending can drive your message home, as the latest training video from The Flame Challenge makes clear

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Corals Are Dissolving Away

New data show that ocean acidification not only stops corals from building, it tears them down

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Ancient Cave Paintings Clinch the Case for Neandertal Symbolism

Abstract images in Spanish caves date back 65,000 years—millennia before Homo sapiens set foot in Europe—settling a long-running debate over Neandertal cognition

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

So, You Want Your Toddler to Grow Up to Win a Gold Medal

Research shows the danger of too much early training

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Astronomers Spot Most Distant Supernova Ever Seen

Light from the powerful cosmic explosion took 10.5 billion years to reach Earth

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Operation Gunnerside: The Norwegian Attack on Heavy Water That Deprived the Nazis of the Atomic Bomb

February 28 marks the 75th anniversary of one of the most dramatic and important military missions of World War II

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Could More Snow in Antarctica Slow Sea Level Rise?

New claims that increased snowfall in eastern regions could offset melting in the western side of the continent might not stand the test of time

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Before Hitting the Road, Self-Driving Cars Should Have to Pass a Driving Test

Researchers can’t always tell exactly why something works but they can evaluate the outcome

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

SpaceX Launches Test Satellites for Internet Constellation

The launch also marked the company’s first attempt to recover and reuse the fairing of its Falcon 9 rocket

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

What Is "Normal," Anyway?

In psychology and psychiatry, it really means "average" or "typical," but we too easily think of it as a synonym for "how everyone is supposed to think and feel"

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

This Is What the Race Gap in Academia Looks Like

Data visualization highlights a problematic pattern in fields associated with intrinsic genius

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Science at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Discover the physics of snowboarding, curling and skating, get inside the minds of athletes, and explore all things Olympics

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

The Science of Diet & Exercise

For decades, experts reduced weight loss to simple math: burn more calories than you consume, without too much regard for what you consumed. Another old maxim presupposes that people who are more…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Readers Respond to the October 2017 Issue

Letters to the editor from the October 2017 issue of Scientific American

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Photographing a Lunar Eclipse in 1960 Took More Than a Snap

Diagrams from the Scientific American archive document a feat of citizen science

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Roots of Unity Turns 5

Happy birthday, dear blog!

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Readers Respond to the September 2017 Issue

Letters to the editor from the September 2017 issue of Scientific American

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Unlocking Happiness

Abraham Lincoln said that people “are usually about as happy as they make up their minds to be," but it may be more accurate to say "as they train their minds to be." Stress…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

Looking Back at the Year in Science

Our editors recap some of the most notable science stories of 2017. Check out https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-top-10-science-stories-of-2017/

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

In Silico Flurries

Computing a world of snowflakes

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

The Future of Money

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

EDUCATIONAL ATTIRE:

This one may be in a class of its own. Curiscope’s Virtuali-Tee is a T-shirt with what looks to be a pixelated image of a human rib cage. The T-shirt comes to life when viewed through an iOS or…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |

COOKING WITH SCIENCE:

PolyScience Culinary’s Smoking Gun Pro is a pistol-like device that uses a flame and a small fan to produce a steady stream of “cold” smoke infused with the fragrance of wood chips,…

– Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Continue reading

Posted in STEM News |