Category Archives: STEM News

NYU Medical School Students Will Get Free Tuition

The move could have benefits far beyond one medical school

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Climate Benefits of Trendy E-Scooters Remain Unclear

Scooter companies tout low carbon footprints, but cities see regulatory headaches

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Sex, Drugs and Self-Control

It’s not just about rebellion. Neuroscience is revealing adolescents’ rich and nuanced relationship with risky behavior

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Rising CO2 Means Monarch Butterfly Bellyaches

Milkweed grown with more carbon dioxide in the air supplies fewer toxins to monarch butterflies that need the toxins to fight off gut parasites.

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Forget the Moon

It’s time to commit to human exploration of Mars

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How to Make a Robot Use Theory of Mind

Researchers give AI the ability to simulate the anticipated needs and actions of others

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Life at the Improv: The Power of Imagination

Stephen Asma, professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago, talks about his two latest books, The Evolution of Imagination and Why We Need Religion.

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Uncertain Hope Blooms for Tasmanian Devils

On a misty summer morning in 2015, Manuel Ruiz ditched his pickup truck along a dusty two-track road in northwest Tasmania and trod into a grove of eucalyptus. He was searching for a devil. “If I were a devil, this would be a nice place to spend the … Continue reading

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For Some Crows, Migration is Optional

Crows are what’s known as ‘partial migrants’—as cold weather approaches some crows fly south, while others stay put. And that behavior appears to be ingrained. Christopher Intagliata…

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Millions of Tiny Seashells Are Affecting How Clouds Form

For a cloud to appear, it takes more than water vapor. Water won’t condense into droplets, or nucleate, without a surface to do so on, and this often takes the form of particles floating around the atmosphere so tiny as to be invisible. Called aeros… Continue reading

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Workers of the World! There Is Efficiency in Idleness

In Kurt Vonnegut’s dystopian novel, Player Piano, things get a little awkward after industrialist Dr. Paul Proteus, escorted in a black government limo, passes a crew of “Reeks and Wrecks,” or displaced laborers who could no longer compete econ… Continue reading

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New Wheat Genome Sequence Could Unlock Hardier Crops

Wheat is one of the most widely cultivated cereals in the world. About 20 percent of the food humans eat has bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

As the world’s population grows, wheat researchers and breeders have been studying how to get even more … Continue reading

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This Scientist Chases Wildfires to Better Predict Fire Behavior

To know what a wildfire might do next, researchers need to know how an inferno interacts with the atmosphere

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Autism and DDT: What 1 Million Pregnancies Can—and Can’t—Reveal

Analysis finds prenatal exposure to the pesticide is associated with a higher risk of severe autism with intellectual impairment

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Scientists Want to Fly an Armored Warplane into Hailstorms

Hail causes most thunderstorm-related damage and could become more common with warming

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A Necessary Evil

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Red Light Cameras May Not Make Streets Safer

Fear of fines may fuel more sudden stops and rear-end accidents

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Prize-Winning Images of the Brain

Check out this year’s winners of The Art of Neuroscience competition

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Life after Drowning

Public health advocates have been coming up with ways to save people for centuries, and they continue to do so

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Are Blockchains the Answer for Secure Elections? Probably Not

As midterm political campaigns shift into full gear, start-ups are pushing for blockchain-based voting

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Hailstorms Cost Americans Billions. It’s Probably Going to Get Worse

BOULDER, Colo. – Severe storms cause tens of billions of dollars in property damage each year. And that cost will likely go up in the coming years thanks in large part to hailstorms.

Climate scientists, meteorologists and insurance experts gather… Continue reading

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People Think Differently Around Robots — Especially When They’re Mean

As prices drop and their functionality expands, you can expect to see humanoid robots in more places, including schools, airports, and hospitals. That’s made researchers curious how androids and their kin will influence human behavior. In a study p… Continue reading

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Children Give in to Robot Peer Pressure

Those of us of a certain age may recall the D.A.R.E. program wafting through our classrooms like so many puffs of smoke. In addition to the evils of drugs and alcohol, and the importance of just saying no, the program highlighted the power of peer pr… Continue reading

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A "Zombie Gene" in Elephants Could Protect Them From Cancer

Millions of years ago, a gene in mammals became useless. Now scientists have discovered the gene has come back to life in elephants, where it’s exceptionally good at killing damaged cells. The “zombie” gene may explain why the long-lived pachyder… Continue reading

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Some Sunscreen Harms Reefs—Warming Could Mean More of It

Worry over environmental damage is being pitted against public health concerns

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A New Method for Making Brilliant, Organic Dyes

The intense, brilliant color of high-tech organic dyes comes at a price — the chemical processes used to make them are extremely harmful to the environment. And these dyes are vital for many modern electronics, like flat screens and debit card chip… Continue reading

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An Entirely New Type of Antidepressant Targets Postpartum Depression

The steroid drug is intended to help women who suffer from the hormone-driven condition

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Industry Trumps Peer-Reviewed Science at EPA

Critics outraged over changes to chemical-safety review guidelines

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New Research about Eating, Sleeping, Eliminating and Snuggling

Recent research looks at basic bodily functions

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We Need to Capture Carbon to Fight Climate Change

Grabbing CO2 as it exits smokestacks is key to fighting climate change

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